Finishing a mask (pt. 2)

Last week I made a post documenting folding a mask. A few days ago I posted about part of the finishing process. Today I wrap it up with the final steps of finishing.

By the end of last post, the mask looked like this:

mask finishing   Shiny bronze. I could have stopped here and called it good, but I really wanted a nice, crunchy verdigris patina on this thing to give it some character. I have a technique I’ve been experimenting with to create an effect of age, oxidation, rust or corrosion.

I apply a layer of crackling (or “craquelure” if you want to sound fancy) with a mix of pigments and Kroma Crackle as a medium. I first found out about Kroma Crackle from Joseph Wu’s use of it on his own origami, as you can see here. When I saw what he was doing, I had to try it for myself. There are a  lot of crackling glazes out there, but they are usually glossy and work best on hard non-porous surfaces. Kroma Crackle has more of a matte finish and is flexible, not brittle, when it dries.

To prepare my verdigris I will assemble my materials.

mask finishing 23   Most of the pigment will be in powder form. In the jar is powdered glauconite, a mineral traditionally used to create blue-green paints. I happened to have some around from years ago when I used to play at making my own paints (but that’s another story). If you’re interested in such things, you can find Rublev natural pigments and other traditional artists’ supplies at NaturalPigments.com.

I also have Micaceous Iron Oxide again, some Phthalo Green and Manganese Blue, and of course the tube of Kroma Crackle.

First I mix up a little of the liquid paints – MIO, Green and Blue in roughly equal measures. mask finishing 24mask finishing 25

Then mix in the glauconite to make a thick mud. Add a little water if necessary, but I only want enough liquid to disperse the particles of glauconite so that it will mix with the Kroma Crackle more easily and without clumps.

mask finishing 26mask finishing 27



When the pigments are thoroughly incorporated in the crackle medium, I use a broad brush to slather the mixture onto the mask.mask finishing 28I want to make sure to get it into all the crevices. After I’ve coated the whole surface evenly I can continue to go over the surface to brush some of the glaze away from the high points so that the bronze underpainting will show through.

 

The crackle glaze takes a long time to dry, but I can accelerate it a bit with a hot air gun. Getting the drying started will at least keep the goo from dripping of the mask before it is dry.

mask finishing 30mask finishing 31

When it dries, it will lighten in color and become opaque. Added a final coat of shellac will make the crackle somewhat more transparent where it is thinnest, so the bronze can come through more. But I have to wait until the crackle is absolutely, completely dry, through and through before I can apply the shellac. That will take no less than 24 hours. Usually it is best to wait a couple of days at least.

mask finishing 32When it is dry, I get out the clear shellac, thinned at with at least 50% alcohol. The crackle glaze drinks up the shellac so I make it very thin and apply it generously. The crackle becomes very transparent when it first absorbs the shellac, but it will become more opaque as it dries.

mask finishing 33mask finishing 34When the shellac has been applied, the surface looks blotchy but that will even out as the shellac cures.creon bAnd finally, the finished mask.

All told, it took about a week to complete this piece but a lot of time is spent waiting for something or another to dry before going to the next step. Usually I have more than one project going on so I always have something to work on.

sargon

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